Summary of Benefits

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Annual Leave

 

Annual leave is provided to employees for paid time off from regularly scheduled work hours. The charts below show how much annual leave is accrued for full-time and part-time employees. Annual leave for full-time employees is credited at the beginning of the leave year, while annual leave for part-time employees is accrued in units of 20, 13, or 10 hours worked. Military service time (in most cases) counts towards USPS service time for determining annual leave per year. (For example: If you served four years in the U.S. military prior to your employment with the USPS your initial annual leave amount would be in the 3-15 year category).

 

Full-Time Employees

Service Time

Leave Per Year

Less than 3 years

104 hours (13 days)

3-15 years

160 hours (20 days)

15 years or more

208 hours (26 days)

 

 
Part-Time Employees

Service Time

Leave Per Year

Rate of Accrual

Less than 3 years

104 hours, or 13 days per 26-period leave year or 4 hours for each bi-weekly pay period.

1 hour for each unit of 20 hours pay in status.

3-15 years

160 hours, or 20 days per 26-period leave year or 6 hours for each full bi-weekly pay period, plus 4 hours in last pay period in leave year.

1 hour for each unit of 13 hours in pay status.

15 years or more

208 hours, or 26 days per 26-period leave year or 8 hours for each full biweekly pay period.

1 hour for each unit of 10 hours in pay status.

 

 
Maximum Leave Carryover Amounts

  • Bargaining Unit Employees: 440 hours (55 days)
  • Postal Career Executive Service (PCES) Employees: Greater of 560 hours or 16 days (128 hours)
  • EAS Employees: 560 hours (70 days)

 

 

 

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Family Medical Leave Act

 

Your Rights Under the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993
From the U.S. Department of Labor

 

FMLA requires covered employers to provide up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave to "eligible" employees for certain family and medical reasons. Employees are eligible if they have worked for a covered employer for at least 1 year, and for 1,250 hours over the previous 12 months, and if there are at least 50 employees within 75 miles.

REASONS FOR TAKING LEAVE: Unpaid leave must be granted for any of the following reasons:
1. to care for the employee's child after birth or placement for adoption or foster care;
2. to care for the employee's spouse, son or daughter, or parent, who has a serious health condition; or
3. for a serious health condition that makes the employee unable to perform the employee's job.
At the employee's or employer's option, certain kinds of paid leave may be substituted for unpaid leave.

ADVANCE NOTICE AND MEDICAL CERTIFICATION: The employee may be required to provide advance leave notice and medical certification. Taking leave may be denied if requirements are not met.
1. The employee ordinarily must provide 30 days advance notice when the leave is "foreseeable."
2. An employer may require medical certification to support a request for leave because of a serious health condition, and may require second or third opinions (at the employer's expense) and a fitness for duty report to return to work.

JOB BENEFITS AND PROTECTION
1.
For the duration of FMLA leave, the employer must maintain the employee's health coverage under any group health plan.
2. Upon return from FMLA leave, most employees must be restored to their original or equivalent positions with equivalent pay, benefits, and other employment terms.
3. The use of FMLA leave cannot result in the loss of any employment benefit that accrued prior to the start of an employee's leave.

UNLAWFUL ACTS BY EMPLOYERS: FMLA makes it unlawful for any employer to:
1. interfere with, restrain, or deny the exercise of any right provided under FMLA.
2. discharge or discriminate against any person for opposing any practice made unlawful by FMLA or involvement in any proceeding  under or relating to FMLA.

ENFORCEMENT:
1. The U.S. Department of Labor is authorized to investigate and resolve complaints of violations.
2. An eligible employee may bring a civil action against an employer for violations.
- FMLA does not affect any Federal or State law prohibiting discrimination, or supersede any State or local law or collective bargaining agreement which provides greater family or medical leave rights.

Certification of Health Care Provider

 

You can have your "serious health condition" classified under FMLA if certain conditions are met. The advantage to you for FMLA classification is that leave taken for a "serious health condition" does not count against you for disciplinary purposes. You should have your health provider complete form WH-380 (see link below) for a "serious health condition" that involves one of the following. (Submit completed form WH-380 to your immediate supervisor.)

 

  1. Hospital Care - inpatient care (i.e., an overnight stay)
  2. Absence Plus Treatment - a period of incapacity of more than three consecutive calendar days that also involves treatment of two or more times.
  3. Pregnancy - or for prenatal care
  4. Chronic Conditions Requiring Treatments - requiring periodic treatments or for treatment of episodic events such as asthma, diabetes, epilepsy, etc.
  5. Permanent/Long-term Conditions Requiring Supervision - permanent or ongoing incapacity due to a condition such as Alzheimer's, a severe stroke, or the terminal stages of a disease.
  6. Multiple Treatments (Non-Chronic Conditions) - for multiple treatments such as for cancer (chemotherapy, radiation, etc.), severe arthritis (physical therapy), kidney disease (dialysis).

The above is a synopsis of WH-380. The complete form, which contains complete "serious health condition" categories, is available online at the Department of Labor. Click here! The Adobe Acrobat Reader is required (.pdf format).
 

 

 

 

 

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Flexible Spending Accounts

Understanding Flexible Spending Accounts:

If you have health care expenses not covered by your health insurance (like doctor and dentist visits, vision care, etc.) you can use Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs) to get a tax break for those expenses. You contribute money from your paychecks to an FSA, which is an account that allows you to cover your eligible health care expenses throughout the year with tax-free money. Whatever you contribute isn't subject to Federal income tax, Social Security tax, or Medicare tax. Since you get a tax break each payday, it's cheaper to pay for your health care expenses through an FSA. Additionally, there is also a Dependent Care FSA which allows you to get the same tax breaks on dependent care (day care) for your eligible children, or for elder care.
 

How FSAs work:

First, you must estimate your yearly health care expenditures not covered by your health insurance. For example, last year you spent $500 on health plan deductibles, $100 for co-payments, $200 for prescriptions, $300 on eyeglasses, and $200 at the dentist's office - that's $1,300. Assume that you will spend the same amount this coming year. You enroll in the Health Care FSA for $1,300 during FSA Open Season. Beginning in Pay Period 1 of 2002 you'll have $50 automatically withheld from each paycheck ($50 x 26 pay periods in one year = $1,300). That $50 per pay period is not subject to Federal income tax, Social Security tax, or Medicare tax. So you'll be paying taxes on $50 less income than if you paid the additional health care expenses out of your pocket.

Whenever you have an eligible health care expense, you send in a claim form with proof of your actual out-of-pocket cost to the FSA Customer Service Center. Normally, within 2 to 3 weeks you will receive a check.
 

Dependent Care FSA:

The Dependent Care FSA is similar (but separate). First, you must estimate what you're going to spend next year on dependent care. Then you sign up to contribute that amount to your Dependent Care FSA.

For example, you expect to pay $3,250 next year for day care for your 4-year old son. You enroll in the Dependent Care FSA for $3,250 during FSA Open Season. Beginning in Pay Period 1 of 2002 you'll have $125 automatically withheld from each paycheck ($125 x 26 pay periods in one year = $3,250). If you're in the 27% Federal tax bracket and you're covered by FERS, your tax rate is 27% Federal + 6.2% Social Security + 1.45% Medicare = a tax rate of 34.65%. So $125 would go into your Dependent Care FSA each payday, but your paycheck would only go down by $82, because you'd be saving $43 in taxes ($125 x 34.65% = $43). By the end of the year you'd save over $1,126 in taxes.
 

Eligible Health Care FSA expenses:

Up to $2,600 of eligible out-of-pocket health care expenses (not covered by insurance) for you and your family if you are a bargaining unit employee and up to $5,000 if you are a nonbargaining unit employee. Expenses include:

  • Eyeglasses, contact lenses, and Lasik (laser) eye surgery
  • Prescription drugs
  • Dental services (exams, fillings, crowns, etc.)
  • Braces
  • Health plan deductibles
  • Co-payments for office visits

You cannot use a Health Care FSA to pay health insurance premiums. However, deductions from your paycheck for health insurance premiums are already tax-free under your health benefits program.
 

Eligible Dependent Care FSA expenses:

Up to $5,000 of dependent care (day care) expenses for your eligible children, or for elder care or day care for your adult dependents, because you (and your spouse if you're married) are working. Expenses include:

  • Day care in your home
  • A licensed child care center
  • A licensed elder care center
  • Nursery school
  • Summer day camp
  • After-school care

More Information:

Enrollment: Once you enroll, your FSA contribution amounts are set for the year. However, if you have certain events (like marriage or divorce) you may change your FSA contribution amounts in keeping with the event.

Taxes: There's one catch in regards to taxes. Any FSA money you haven't used, you lose. (You have an extra 6 months after the calendar year to file your FSA claims.)

Restrictions: Health Care FSA money can only be used for health care expenses and Dependent Care FSA money can only be used for dependent care expenses.

More information: FSA Customer Service Center - 1-800-842-2026 from 8:00 A.M. to 10:00 P.M. Eastern Time. They will be glad to answer any questions about FSAs that you may have.

 

FSA Tax Savings Estimator

FERS EMPLOYEES (and CSRS Offset Employees)

15%

Your Federal income tax bracket

27%

5%

State income tax (assumption)

5%

7.65%

Social Security/Medicare

7.65%

27.65%

TAX RATE

39.65%

 

Your estimated Annual Tax Savings

 

Your
Savings

Your Annual Health Care and/or
Dependent Care FSA Contribution

Your
Savings

$138

$500

$198

$207

$750

$297

$277

$1,000

$397

$553

$2,000

$793

$830

$3,000

$1,190

$1,106

$4,000

$1,586

$1,383

$5,000

$1,983

$1,659

$6,000

$2,379

$1,936

$7,000

$2,776

$2,101

$7,600

$3,013

$2,765

$10,000*

$3,965

 

*Amount available only to
nonbargaining employees

 

 

CSRS EMPLOYEES

15%

Your Federal income tax bracket

27%

5%

State income tax (assumption)

5%

1.45%

Medicare

1.45%

21.45%

TAX RATE

33.45%

 

Your estimated Annual Tax Savings

 

Your
Savings

Your Annual Health Care and/or
Dependent Care FSA Contribution

Your
Savings

$107

$500

$167

$161

$750

$251

$215

$1,000

$335

$429

$2,000

$669

$644

$3,000

$1,004

$858

$4,000

$1,338

$1,073

$5,000

$1,673

$1,287

$6,000

$2,007

$1,502

$7,000

$2,342

$1,630

$7,600

$2,542

$2,145

$10,000*

$3,345

 

*Amount available only to
nonbargaining employees

 

Source: FSA LF1 (November 2001)

 

 

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Health Insurance

Health Benefits: The Federal Employees Health Benefit Plan (FEHBP), administered by the Office of Personnel Management, is among the most generous and popular of all postal benefit plans. Depending on the employee's craft and selected health care plan, the USPS pays from 71% to about 88% of the premium.

Virtually all career USPS employees (and eligible family members) are covered by the FEHBP. Employees that are not eligible (with certain exceptions) include those serving in a temporary position lasting less than a year (including Casual and Temporary Employees, Substitute Rural Carriers, and Rural Carrier Associates). Other exclusions include non-citizens and employees paid on a contract or fee basis including contract job cleaners and contract carriers.

Several types of plans are available, including the Service Benefit Plan (available nationwide), Employee Organization Plans (available through employee organizations such as labor unions), and Comprehensive Medical Plans (group practice plans/HMOs) available regionally. You must consider your individual and family situation in deciding which health plan is best for you and your family.
  

For more information about your health benefits please consult the Employee and Labor Relations Manual (ELM) at USPS.com. Click here!


The following sites also have information about your health benefits:

 

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Holiday Leave

Holiday Leave

Observed Holidays
The following 10 days are observed as holidays by the U.S. Postal Service.

a.       New Year’s Day - January 1.
b. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Birthday - 3rd Monday in January.
c. Washington’s Birthday - 3rd Monday in February.
d. Memorial Day - Last Monday in May.
e. Independence Day - July 4.
f. Labor Day - 1st Monday in September.
g. Columbus Day - 2nd Monday in October.
h. Veterans’ Day - November 11.
i. Thanksgiving Day - 4th Thursday in November.
j. Christmas Day - December 25.

Memorial Day of 2002 will be the first holiday on which mail handlers, if they choose, can take advantage of the new holiday leave provisions that are now part of Article 11 of the National Agreement. Under these new provisions, full-time and part-time regular employees may elect to receive up to eight hours of annual leave instead of holiday leave pay.

In particular, under the new contract language, eligible employees (which means regular employees who are in a pay status "the last hour of the employee's scheduled workday prior to or the first hour of the employee's scheduled workday after the holiday") who work any part of their holiday or the day designated as their holiday may choose to receive additional annual leave instead of additional pay for working on the holiday. The annual leave option is available whether or not the employee volunteers or is required to work on his/her holiday or day designated as his/her holiday.

If the employee elects to receive additional annual leave instead of additional holiday pay, the appropriate payment for hours that are actually worked on the holiday will still be paid. But holiday leave hours will not be paid, and instead the employee's annual leave balance will be adjusted by the number of hours to which the employee would be entitled (8 hours for full-time employees; up to 8 hours, depending on regular schedule, for part-time regular employees). Because the new leave will be credited as annual leave, it will be subject to the usual rules for using annual leave and/or losing annual leave if the employee is over the maximum leave carryover at the end of the leave year.

Mail handlers who want to choose annual leave instead of holiday leave pay must use Form 3971 to notify management of their intent. Until modifications to Form 3971 are finalized, employees should (1) check the block labeled "Other" under "Type of Absence" and (2) write the words "Elect Annual Leave in lieu of Holiday Leave (name of holiday - e.g., Memorial Day)" in the "Remarks" section of the Form. The form must be submitted to the supervisor no later than the end of the employee's holiday.

The employee's request (Form 3971) must be signed and dated by the supervisor, who will keep the original for recordkeeping purposes and give a copy to the employee. Until payroll changes are finalized, the additional annual leave hours will not appear on the employee's annual leave balances. The leave will be available for use, however, the pay period following the holiday, subject to normal leave approval procedures.

Here are answers to the most frequently asked questions about these new provisions:

Q: Does it make any difference how many hours an employee works on the holiday?
A: No, employees are granted the annual leave option if they work on their holiday, regardless of the number of hours worked.

Q: If an employee works his/her entire shift on a holiday, and chooses to exercise his/her option to receive annual leave, what happens?
A: The employee will receive 8 hours of holiday pay, for the hours actually worked, and a credit of 8 hours to his/her annual leave balance, instead of receiving 16 hours of pay for working on the holiday. In other words, the employee is giving up 8 hours of pay, but will get 8 hours of annual leave.

Q: If the employee does not work a full day, must the employee take leave for the remainder of his/her day?
A: If an employee elects annual leave in lieu of holiday leave pay, and requests to work only part of the holiday, the employee must request some type of paid or unpaid leave (e.g., annual, sick, LWOP) to account for the remainder of the day. For example, if the employee works for 5 hours, he or she would have to take 3 hours of leave. Supervisors may deny requests to work only part of the holiday, but supervisors should exercise their discretion to approve or disapprove leave requests based on local leave policy and procedures. If an employee works a partial holiday because management requires it, guaranteed time is normally appropriate for the remainder of the day.

Q: May mail handlers who do not work any part of their holiday or designated holiday elect annual leave in lieu of holiday leave pay?
A: No. Only mail handlers who work on their holiday are eligible for this new annual leave option.

 

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Injury Compensation

Injury Compensation Program: All USPS employees are covered by the Federal  Employee's Compensation Act (FECA). The program is administered by the Office of Workers' Compensation (OWCP) - United States Department of Labor. FECA entitles employees that have suffered a job-related disability to:

  • Continuation of regular pay for the period of the disability, up to a maximum of 45 calendar days, for a traumatic job-related injury.
  • Compensation for wages lost as a result of job-related injury or illness.
  • Medical care for disability due to (1) personal injuries sustained while in the performance of duty (2) Diseases proximately caused, aggravated, or accelerated by postal employment.
  • Vocational rehabilitation.

For more information about injury compensation please consult the Employee and Labor Relations Manual (ELM) at USPS.com. Click here!
 

The following links also have information about injury compensation:

 

 

 

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Life Insurance

 

Life Insurance: The Office of Personnel Management administers the Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance (FEGLI) Program. Nearly all USPS employees receive Basic Life Insurance coverage, however, there are some exceptions. Substitute Rural Carriers, Casual or Temporary Employees (including Rural Carrier Associates) generally are excluded from the program. Full-time employees are covered by an amount of basic insurance based on their annual basic pay, while part-time employees are covered by an amount of basic insurance based on multiplying their basic hourly rate. Below, you will find information about your FEGLI insurance benefits. (Information is deemed reliable but not guaranteed.)
 

Basic Life (Free - for postal employees)

Your basic life insurance coverage amount depends on your annual basic pay (excludes COLA). Here's how to figure your total Basic Life Insurance:

  • Take your current annual base pay
  • If not an exact thousand, round up to next thousand
  • Add $2000 - This is your total Basic Life

Example:

  • Your annual base pay is $42,323
  • Round up to $43,000
  • Add $2000
  • Total: $45,000 - This is your total Basic Life

Extra Benefit:

Age

Factor

Age

Factor

0-35

2.0

41

1.4

36

1.9

42

1.3

37

1.8

43

1.2

38

1.7

44

1.1

39

1.6

45

0.0

40

1.5

 

 

 
To figure your total coverage with the extra benefit multiply your total Basic Life times the appropriate factor. For example:

  • You are 36 years old
  • Total Basic Life (from example above) $45,000
  • Multiply $45,000 x 1.9
  • Total: $85,500 - Total Insurance

Option A - Standard ($10,000)

Age Cat.

Group

Bi-Weekly

Monthly

1

Under age 35

$0.30

$0.65

2

35 through 39

$0.40

$0.87

3

40 through 44

$0.60

$1.30

4

45 through 49

$0.90

$1.95

5

50 through 54

$1.40

$3.03

6

55 through 59

$2.70

$5.85

7

60 through 64

$6.00

$13.00

8

65 through 69

$6.00

$13.00

9

70 and over

$6.00

$13.00

 

Option B - Additional

You can purchase 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 times your Basic Life (rounded up to next thousand).

Withholding per $1,000 insurance

Age Cat.

Group

Bi-Weekly

Monthly

1

Under age 35

$0.03

$0.065

2

35 through 39

$0.04

$0.087

3

40 through 44

$0.06

$0.130

4

45 through 49

$0.10

$0.217

5

50 through 54

$0.15

$0.325

6

55 through 59

$0.31

$0.672

7

60 through 64

$0.70

$1.517

8

65 through 69

$0.90

$1.517

9

70 and over

$1.40

$1.517

 

Option C - Family

Purchase 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 times:
Spouse - $5,000        Child (also eligible for Foster) - $2,500

Age Cat.

Group

Bi-Weekly

Monthly

1

Under age 35

$0.27

$0.59

2

35 through 39

$0.34

$0.74

3

40 through 44

$0.46

$1.00

4

45 through 49

$0.60

$1.30

5

50 through 54

$0.90

$1.95

6

55 through 59

$1.45

$3.14

7

60 through 64

$2.60

$5.63

8

65 through 69

$3.00

$6.50

9

70 and over

$3.40

$7.37

 

For more information about life insurance consult the FEGLI Home Page and/or the Employee and Labor Relations Manual (ELM) at USPS.com.

 
Life Insurance Handbooks:
FEGLI Life Insurance program booklets and handbooks can be found at the FEGLI Home Page.
 

 

 

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PostalEASE

 

Call PostalEASE toll-free at 1-877-4PS-EASE (1-877-477-3273)
 

PostalEASE

PostalEase is the U.S. Postal Service's telephone enrollment system for Thrift Savings Plan transactions, Direct Deposit/allotments and more. The USPS uses several PIN numbers. Please see our PIN Numbers page for a complete explanation of USPS PIN numbers.

Have the following information ready when calling PostalEASE:
- Your Social Security Number (SSN)
- Your Personal Identification Number (PIN). If you don't know your PIN, call PostalEASE and follow the prompts to request that your PIN be mailed to your address of record. (This takes 10 days or less.)

If using PostalEASE for your allotment/net to bank options, please have the following additional information ready:
- Your 9 digit Financial Institution Routing Number (obtain from your financial institution)
- Your Account Number and type of account

After completing your transaction you will hear your confirmation number, when your choices will be processed, and when your choices will be reflected in your paycheck. Record this information for your reference.
 

 

 

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Retirement

 

The Office of Personnel and Management (OPM) administers both USPS retirement programs - the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) and the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS). The CSRS generally applies to employees who received a career appointment before January 1, 1984 while the FERS applies to employees whose initial career appointment was January 1, 1984 or later, and CSRS employees that elected to transfer to FERS. Both systems have the same purposes, however, both operate under a unique set of guidelines and rules. 

Many employees believe that USPS retirement benefits are some of the most substantial in the nation. Many, upon reaching retirement age, are shocked to learn that they will be facing a 50% to 75% or more loss in income after retirement. Although, postal retirement benefits may not be all that public legend has them to be, they can provide a secure retirement with the proper planning. Below, are brief overviews of each retirement system. (Information is deemed reliable but not guaranteed.)

Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS)

Information from the OPM:

Retirement Eligibility

Benefits are payable after...

Your Minimum Retirement Age (MRA) is

30 years of service

Age 55

20 years of service

Age 60

5 years of service

Age 62

 

Retirement Percentages Based on Years of Service

5

7.50%

18

32.25%

31

58.25%

6

9.25%

19

34.25%

32

60.25%

7

11.00%

20

36.25%

33

62.25%

8

12.75%

21

38.25%

34

64.25%

9

14.50%

22

40.25%

35

66.25%

10

16.25%

23

42.25%

36

68.25%

11

18.25%

24

44.25%

37

70.25%

12

20.25%

25

46.25%

38

72.25%

13

22.25%

26

48.25%

39

74.25%

14

24.25%

27

50.25%

40

76.25%

15

26.25%

28

52.25%

41

78.25%

16

28.25%

29

54.25%

42

80.00%

17

30.25%

30

56.25%

43

80.00%

 

Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS)

Information from the OPM:

Retirement Eligibility

Benefits are payable with 30 years service. The minimum retirement age (MRA) is determined by an individual’s year of birth, as follows:

Year of Birth

Your MRA is age...

Before 1948

55

In 1948

55 and 2 months

In 1949

55 and 4 months

In 1950

55 and 6 months

In 1951

55 and 8 months

In 1952

55 and 10 months

In 1953 - 1964

56

In 1965

56 and 2 months

In 1966

56 and 4 months

In 1967

56 and 6 months

In 1968

56 and 8 months

In 1969

56 and 10 months

In 1970 and after

57

20 years of Service

Age 60

10 years of Service

with a reduction of 5% for each
year under age 62

5 years of Service

Age 62

 

FERS Annuity

(Note: Second line of each income level indicates annuity with survivor deduction.)

High 3 Average Pay

Years of Creditable Service

Income

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

38,000

158

317

475

633

792

950

1108

1267

 

143

285

428

570

713

855

998

1140

40,000

167

333

500

667

833

1000

1167

1333

 

150

300

450

600

750

900

1050

1200

44,000

183

367

550

733

917

1100

1283

1467

 

165

330

495

660

825

990

1155

1320

50,000

208

417

625

833

1042

1250

1458

1667

 

188

375

563

750

938

1125

1313

1500

60,000

250

500

750

1000

1250

1500

1750

2000

 

225

450

675

900

1125

1350

1575

1800

70,000

292

583

875

1167

1458

1750

2042

2333

   

263

525

788

1050

1313

1575

1838

2100

 

Additional information about CSRS and FERS:

For more information about your retirement benefits please consult the Employee and Labor Relations Manual (ELM ) at USPS.com:

More information about your retirement benefits:

Handbooks

 

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Sick Leave

 

Sick leave is provided to employees for paid time off from regularly scheduled work hours due to illness, injury, pregnancy, and medical examinations and treatment (including dental and optical). Sick leave is accrued and credited at the end of each bi-weekly pay period in which it is earned.
 

Category

Sick Leave Time Accrued

Full-Time Employees

4 hours for each full biweekly pay period: 104 hours (13 days per year)

Part-Time Employees

1 hour for each unit of 20 hours in pay status up to 104 hours (13 days year)

 
For more information about sick leave please consult the Employee and Labor Relations Manual (ELM) at USPS.com. Click here!
 

 

 

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Thrift Savings Plan

 

You can find general information about the TSP on this Web site www.tsp.gov.  If you are participating in the TSP, you can also obtain information about your individual TSP account in the Account Access section.  To do so, you will need your Social Security number and your 4-digit TSP Personal Identification Number (PIN).  If you do not know your PIN, you can request a new one in that section.

 

 

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Unemployment Compensation

 

Unemployment Compensation: The Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees Program (UCFE) is administered by each state under separate agreements with the U.S. Secretary of Labor. Although unemployment compensation benefits vary from state to state in accordance to each state's employment security law, each state law requires that a claimant:

  • Be unemployed or be employed less than full-time as defined by the state employement security law with earnings less than an amount specified in the state law.
  • Register for work and file an unemployment compensation claim at a local state employment security office.
  • Have worked a specified amount of time or have earned a specified amount of wages, or both, within a certain period.
  • Be able to work.
  • Be available for work.
  • Be actively seeking work.
  • Report periodically to the local state employment security office.

For more information contact your state employment security office or consult the Employee and Labor Relations Manual (ELM) at USPS.com. Click here!
 

 

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U.S. Savings Bonds

 

U.S. Savings Bonds: Postal Employees may purchase U.S. Savings Bonds through payroll deduction. U.S. Savings Bonds can be a smart addition to a personal savings program. Advantages include stable rates, paying no state or local income taxes on Savings Bond interest, and no federal tax until you cash the bonds. Backed by the U.S. Treasury, U.S. Savings Bonds are one of the most secure investments that you can make. To learn more about U.S. Savings Bonds visit the Savings Bonds Web site or call 1-800-4US-BOND (1-800-487-2663). To enroll, request PS Form 1192 (U.S. Savings Bond Authorization for Purchase and Request for Change) from your local Human Resources office.

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Last revised: August 4, 2008